Big Tech and the National Health Service: Maintaining Equity in the AI Revolution

Where: Landmark Center at 401 Park Drive, 5th floor East, Boston, MA 02215

Speaker: Maxine Mackintosh, PhD, at the Alan Turing Institute and University College London

Date: October 21, 2019 at 4:00PM - 5:30PM

A day does not go by without a new framework for ethics in AI, particularly in health and social care. But when your health system is based on need versus ability to pay, yet the skills, computational power and often data lies in tech companies, from SMEs to multinationals, it can be difficult to see how a health system can digitize in an equitable and ethical manner. Maxine’s talk will share some examples of the learnings, attitudes and practical ways the UK has approached data stewardship, partnerships, “intangible assets" and transparency of health data organizations looking to work with the NHS. These examples will include learnings from DeepMind Health’s Independent Review Board, the use of consumer data in the UK for health research, and how the UK is approaching some of these discussions at a national, policy level.

Maxine Mackintosh is a PhD student at the Alan Turing Institute and University College London’s Institute of Health Informatics. Dr. Mackintosh is currently in Boston as a Winston Churchill Fellow. Her PhD involves using medical records to uncover early signs of dementia. Dr. Mackintosh is interested in how we might make better use of routinely collected data to inform our understanding of health and diseases. Prior to this, she completed a BSc in Biomedical Sciences (UCL) and an MSc in Health Policy, Planning and Financing (LSE & LSHTM).In addition, Maxine is the co-founder of One HealthTech — an international, volunteer-led, grassroots community which champions and supports underrepresented groups, particularly women, to be the future leaders in health innovation. Her professional work has led her to the Royal Society, Roche, L’Oreal, Department for International Development and NHS England. She is part of a number of communities and committees including the World Economic Forum’s Global Shapers, and the British Computer Society (Health Exec). Maxine also sat on DeepMind Health’s Independent Review Board and has a particular interest in fair and appropriate partnerships in the NHS.

Publications

Kiang MV, Santillana M, Chen JT, Onnela JP, Krieger N, Engø-Monsen K, Ekapirat N, Areechokchai D, Prempree P, Maude RJ, Buckee CO. Incorporating human mobility data improves forecasts of Dengue fever in Thailand. Scientific reports 2021.

Rubinstein YR, Robinson PN, Gahl WA, Avillach P, Baynam G, Cederroth H, Goodwin RM, Groft SC, Hansson MG, Harris NL, Huser V, Mascalzoni D, McMurry JA, Might M, Nellaker C, Mons B, Paltoo DN, Pevsner J, Posada M, Rockett-Frase AP, Roos M, Rubinstein TB, Taruscio D, van Enckevort E, Haendel MA. The case for open science: rare diseases. JAMIA open 2020.

Ferenczi S, Solymosi N, Horváth I, Szeőcs N, Grózer Z, Kuti D, Juhász B, Winkler Z, Pankotai T, Sükösd F, Stágel A, Paholcsek M, Dóra D, Nagy N, Kovács KJ, Zanoni I, Szallasi Z. Efficient treatment of a preclinical inflammatory bowel disease model with engineered bacteria. Molecular therapy. Methods & clinical development 2021.

Liu D, Olson KL, Manzi SF, Mandl KD. Patients dispensed medications with actionable pharmacogenomic biomarkers: rates and characteristics. Genetics in medicine : official journal of the American College of Medical Genetics 2021.

Diao JA, Inker LA, Levey AS, Tighiouart H, Powe NR, Manrai AK. In Search of a Better Equation - Performance and Equity in Estimates of Kidney Function. The New England journal of medicine 2021.