The CHIP AI Internship is an opportunity for undergraduate students at Harvard College to develop new machine learning and artificial intelligence approaches and apply them to fundamental challenges in biomedicine. Internships will be on a rolling basis and every intern will be matched with a core CHIP faculty member.

Interns will be exposed to the many facets of artificial intelligence and machine learning applied to challenges in healthcare, including:

  • the analysis of very large datasets spanning tens of millions individuals
  • digital surveillance and machine learning approaches for public health
  • clinical decision making using high-throughput molecular and clinical data (e.g. whole-exome sequencing)
Admissions

A call for applications is now open and positions are available on a rolling basis.

Qualifications

Being an intern at CHIP means being given meaningful, fulfilling, skill-building tasks and projects that are designed to set you up for success in your future career. Interns are/have:

  • current undergraduate students at Harvard College
  • strong quantitative and computer science skills (relevant [but not required] coursework: CS50, Stat 110/111, CS181, CS109, BMI704)
  • hardworking, detail-oriented, and efficient
  • an interest in machine learning in health care
  • an ability to multitask, work independently, and be self-directed
How to apply

Please send your resume and a cover letter to chip@childrens.harvard.edu and reference "CHIP AI Internship" in the subject line.

Publications

Zhang A, Teng L, Alterovitz G. An explainable machine learning platform for pyrazinamide resistance prediction and genetic feature identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA 2020.

Geva A, Stedman JP, Manzi SF, Lin C, Savova GK, Avillach P, Mandl KD. Adverse drug event presentation and tracking (ADEPT): semiautomated, high throughput pharmacovigilance using real-world data. JAMIA open 2020.

Börcsök J, Sztupinszki Z, Bekele R, Gao SP, Diossy M, Samant AS, Dillon KM, Tisza V, Spisák S, Rusz O, Csabai I, Pappot H, Frazier ZJ, Konieczkowski DJ, Liu D, Vasani N, Rodrigues JA, Solit DB, Hoffman-Censits JH, Plimack ER, Rosenberg JE, Lazaro JB, Taplin ME, Iyer G, Brunak S, Lozsa R, Van Allen EM, Szüts D, Mouw KW, Szallasi Z. Identification of a synthetic lethal relationship between nucleotide excision repair (NER) deficiency and irofulven sensitivity in urothelial cancer. Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research 2020.

Gokuldass A, Draghi A, Papp K, Borch TH, Nielsen M, Westergaard MCW, Andersen R, Schina A, Bol KF, Chamberlain CA, Presti M, Met Ö, Harbst K, Lauss M, Soraggi S, Csabai I, Szállási Z, Jönsson G, Svane IM, Donia M. Qualitative Analysis of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes across Human Tumor Types Reveals a Higher Proportion of Bystander CD8 T Cells in Non-Melanoma Cancers Compared to Melanoma. Cancers 2020.

Perera G, Rijnbeek PR, Alexander M, Ansell D, Avillach P, Duarte-Salles T, Gordon MF, Lapi F, Mayer MA, Pasqua A, Pedersen L, van Der Lei J, Visser PJ, Stewart R. Vascular and metabolic risk factor differences prior to dementia diagnosis: a multidatabase case-control study using European electronic health records. BMJ open 2020.